The Look of Love poster by Jack Vettriano

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The Look Of Love – Exhibition Poster
Limited Edition Exhibition Poster
32 x 24 ins   Framed size: 34.0 x 26.0 ins

Unframed: £35.00

Framed: £115.00

This limited edition poster is one of two designs that we have published to accompany the forthcoming exhibition, ‘Days of Wine and Roses’, which opened at the Kirkcaldy Museum & Art Gallery in Fife on 27th March 2010.

The posters will be available from 27th March 2010 but may be pre-ordered now.

Printed on 300gsm white essential silk board, the seven posters are available unframed or framed in a 1.2inch square cut, warm black frame with a brown highlight on the inner and outer edges. The frame has a vintage feel and was selected by the artist for the framing of his posters.

About Photogold David

Photographer David Rankin set up the UK's first online prints gallery , Photogold , in 1998

New Terry Bradley exhibition

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Artist Terry Bradley’s new exhibition shows a new side to his work .

“It’s another side to what I do — there are the heavily-tattooed men and women that I’m best known for and now there are these lighter, calmer works.

“They’ll be on display for the first time in the old Northern Bank building on Waring Street, which is a perfect setting.”

Terry painted his first canvas 14 years ago as a present, but his work is now held in private collections all over the world and fans include Madonna, The Bee Gees, Michael Flatley, Bono and Ronan Keating.

As well as famous patrons, Terry has attracted new admirers in the most unexpected place — Northern Ireland’s prisons — and he recently spent time behind bars with male and female inmates. He explains: “Earlier this year, I received an email from Magilligan Prison saying the inmates loved my work and would I have any brochures or anything I could send to them. Then I heard that a prisoner had committed suicide and decided to go and speak to them in person.
“I also went to Hydebank Women’s Prison and the inmates had pictures on the wall of their versions of my female paintings.

“Again, I just spent time talking with them about their lives, art and about why and how I do what I do. There were bare canvasses in one corner of the room and as I knew a few of the women were soon to be released, I did some drawings and gave them one each. I told them that they would be worth a few grand and that it would give them a start, or they could just keep the sketches for themselves. They really appreciated that. Meeting people like that does as much for me as it does for them. It really lifts me up. Art is a great thing. As therapy, it’s been hippie-fied a bit, but it is a very rewarding thing to do and a great way of expressing yourself.When my father died earlier this year, I received flowers from the prisoners, which was really touching.”

One of four children born and bred in the Oldpark Road area of north Belfast, Terry began his working life as a model in Dublin. He was sketching and drawing since his days at Newtownbreda High School, but a nightclub owner spotted his potential .

“In 1995, I did a piece as a present for a friend who had always looked after me when I was broke,” he recalls.

He owned a club called The Pod in Dublin and I painted a picture of all the regulars. He loved it and asked me to put on a show.

“I declined at first, but after a few more drinks, I agreed. I was astonished when it sold out and things progressed from there.”

Married to former medical photographer Ashley, who now helps him with the business side of things, Terry divides his time between homes in Kircubbin and Dublin.He admits that combining the solitary life of an artist with being dad to Zak (10), Hal (7) and Etta Blue (5) can sometimes lead to unusual living arrangements.
Although his paintings now sell for thousands of pounds, Terry insists that becoming successful was far from easy.

“Nothing comes to your door. You have to put yourself out there and get your work seen. I may be doing ok now, but it wasn’t always like that.Everyone thinks it’s a glamorous existence, but they don’t see what goes into it and the personal sacrifices.For instance, yesterday I worked all day and then all night until 4am, full-on. And I’ve been doing that for years.Yes, there are nice things I can do now, but it’s taken a long time and as well as drive, an awful lot of luck was involved.For a young artist starting out today, it’s beyond tough. I can see why people opt for illustration and computer design because you can make a decent living from that.

“I know a lot of computer designers who are resigned to being artists on the side. There are a lot of facilities available and a lot of talent out there. But the local art scene and the funding in Northern Ireland is all very closed shop, ‘who you know’ and ‘let’s not rock the boat’. It’s terrible.There isn’t any help or support for someone who is outside the ‘clique’.

Terry , much like Jack Vettriano , has had to develop a thick skin himself to deal with the snobs who look down on his unique style and self-taught status.

“Art is for everyone, but the high-brow art world tends to close itself away in rooms and have nothing to do with people on the street. I avoid that whole scene. I do what I do and freely admit I have no idea about other artists or art history. I do admire Jack Vettriano though, simply because of the way he is. His commercial success and style is sneered at by critics, yet people love his work. That’s the way I am. I’m just a guy. I do what I do and if people like my paintings and buy them, I’m over the moon.”
Terry Bradley’s new exhibition will be unveiled at a private showing in the old Northern Bank building, 2 Waring Street, Belfast, on Thursday. The exhibition then opens to the public at Eakin Gallery, Lisburn Road, until November 27 . Jack Vettriano is one of Photogold ‘s first artists

About Photogold David

Photographer David Rankin set up the UK's first online prints gallery , Photogold , in 1998

Selling art online for new artists

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Hammersley Red Rocks by Rolf Harris
Hammersley Red Rocks by Rolf Harris

New artists can find it difficult to start selling their art for many reasons . There are 2 options which I would recommend for anyone trying to sell their art .

First of all artists should contact local and online galleries to showcase their work . Each gallery can offer something different so it is important to speak to a wide range of businesses.

Secondly, in the digital age every artist should have his or her own website . An online presence is vital in order to establish your name . A website gives an artist credibility and the ability to sell their own work without any commission. There are many different approaches to setting up an ecommerce site. Photogold set this site up in 1998 and we have been selling art online ever since . Our new project Photogold Ecommerce offers artists the option of having their own website with an integrated shopping cart . We can give advice on the best way of promoting your new website . For more details phone David Rankin on 07723-538941 or contact us online

About Photogold David

Photographer David Rankin set up the UK's first online prints gallery , Photogold , in 1998

Photogold goes mobile

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the game of life , jack vettriano
the game of life , jack vettriano

Photogold is going mobile with our new mobile website – . The new mobile site is specifically designed for mobile phones . The site features picture galleries of artists including Jack Vettriano with online ordering.Photogold has been selling art at great online prices since 1998 . For more details phone sales manager David Rankin on 07723 538941 for our best price .Photogold is committed to supplying products of the highest quality. All products come with a 100% satisfaction guarantee.

About Photogold David

Photographer David Rankin set up the UK's first online prints gallery , Photogold , in 1998

Irving Penn has died , aged 92

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Photographer Irving Penn , one of the greatest photographers of the 20th century , has dies aged 92 . His pictures showed a stark simplicity whether he was shooting celebrity portraits, fashion, still life or remote places of the world. The death was announced by his photo assistant, Roger Krueger. Penn, who constantly explored the photographic medium and its boundaries, typically preferred to isolate his subjects — from fashion models to Aborigine tribesmen — from their natural settings to photograph them in a studio against a stark background. He believed the studio could most closely capture their true natures.

Between 1964 and 1971, he completed seven such projects, his subjects ranging from New Guinea mud men to San Francisco hippies. Penn also had a fascination with still life and produced a dramatic range of images that challenged the traditional idea of beauty, giving dignity to such subjects as cigarette butts, decaying fruit and discarded clothing. A 1977 show at the Metropolitan Museum of Art presented prints of trash rescued from Manhattan streets and photographed, lovingly, against plain backgrounds.

“Photographing a cake can be art,” he said at the 1953 opening of his studio, where he continued to produce commercial and gallery work into the 21st century.
Penn’s career began in the 1940s as a fashion photographer for Vogue, and he continued to contribute to the magazine for decades thereafter. He stumbled into the job almost by accident, when he abandoned his early ambition to become a painter and took a position as a designer in the magazine’s art department in 1943. Staff photographers balked at his unorthodox layout ideas, and a supervisor asked him to photograph a cover design.
The resulting image, on the Oct. 1, 1943, cover of Vogue, was a striking still-life showing a brown leather bag, a beige scarf, gloves, oranges and lemons arranged in the shape of a pyramid. In subsequent photographs for the magazine, Penn further developed his austere style that placed models and fashion accessories against clean backdrops. It was a radical departure at a time when most fashion photographers posed their subjects with props and in busy settings that tended to draw attention from the clothes themselves.

About Photogold David

Photographer David Rankin set up the UK's first online prints gallery , Photogold , in 1998

Titian paintings campaign succeeds – controversy rages over purchase

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The campaign to secure the £50m needed to buy a 16th Century painting by Titian for the nation has succeeded. The painting – Diana and Actaeon – was offered for sale by its owner, the Duke of Sutherland, last summer.

The National Galleries of Scotland and London’s National Gallery raised the money with help from other sources .The Scottish Government has pledged £12.5m, £7.4m has come from public donations and £12.5m has come from National Galleries in London.

The rest of the money has come from the National Heritage Memorial Fund, which has given £10m; the Monument Trust has pledged £2m; £4.6m has come from the National Galleries of Scotland and £1m was secured from the Art Fund.

The deadline for the sale was 31 December but that was extended to allow funds to be raised.

The painting has been on public display in Britain for more than 200 years

A political row broke out in January after reports that the Scottish Government was contributing £17.5m towards acquiring the work of art.

Glasgow South West MP Ian Davidson challenged the decision to spend such large sums during an economic downturn. Plans have been completed for the painting to alternate between the galleries in London and Edinburgh. The painting has been on public display at the National Galleries of Scotland in Edinburgh and London for more than 200 years.

Its owner, the Duke Of Sutherland, decided in the summer of 2007 to sell the painting and a public campaign was launched by the galleries last August in a bid to raise the money.

Now the galleries have secured funds to buy Diana and Actaeon, a second Titian painting – Diana and Callisto – will be offered for sale in four years.

The two Titians were created as part of a cycle of works for King Philip II of Spain from 1556 to 1559 and form part of the Bridgewater collection, which has been on loan to the National Galleries of Scotland since 1945. The collection also includes three paintings by Raphael, a Rembrandt, a Van Dyck, and a Tintoretto.

John Leighton, director general of the National Galleries of Scotland said: “We are absolutely thrilled that one of the most important paintings in the world will be added to the national collections for the enjoyment and inspiration of the public and we are delighted that the world-famous Bridgewater Collection will continue to be available on long loan to Scotland.

“We are hugely grateful to all the individuals and all the funding bodies who responded so warmly and wholeheartedly to this campaign over the past four months.”

Dr Nicholas Penny, director of the National Gallery, London said the appeal to buy the painting had been “astonishing”.

Scotland’s Minister for Culture, Linda Fabiani, said that at a time of global economic downturn all funding decisions “must offer real value for money and a strong return on investment”.

About Photogold David

Photographer David Rankin set up the UK's first online prints gallery , Photogold , in 1998

Photogold featured artist – Suzan Wolters

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Magic Moment
Suzan Wolters .Suzan is a full time artist and has been for the past 25 years.
Suzan:”My love for working in clay is one of my most vivid childhood memories, I have been growing up with paint and clay, it was almost inevitable that I was being drawn to dedicate my live sculpting and painting. From my early twenties up to now I have been sculpting and painting, at first reproductions of antique dolls in porcelain, after that I sculpted infants in polymer clay and later my well known and recognizable happy plus-size woman in their full form.
I have always been enchanted with sculpts and paintings of big woman, in particulair happy ones, they are often so much more buoyant and graceful than thinner woman”.

Suzan received for her sculptings several prestigious prices at International art shows in New York. Her sculptings are collectible items in Japan, the USA, Australia, Russia and Europe.

“A few years ago my mother moved to a new house and asked me to paint her a big happy woman, I thought that would be a fun thing to do and a passion emerged….I was hooked!
Every time I am working on a painting I get ‘bewitched’ in putting together a voluptuous confident and happy female,it is a very fulfilling and gratifying experience.
I work mainly from live models, beautiful plus size woman with a positive image of themselves.

A ‘feel good’ mood and a smile is what Suzan is hoping for when people view her work.

Suzan Wolters admits to being a big fan of Beryl Cook

About Photogold David

Photographer David Rankin set up the UK's first online prints gallery , Photogold , in 1998

Selling art online with Photogold

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Photogold is the UK’s first online art gallery. It was established in September 1998 . Photogold E-commerce now offers website packages for artists who want to start selling their work online. Photogold can set up an art blog to establish an artist’s presence online and offer prints and paintings for sale .A blog is a web log or online journal

What are the advantages of a blog ?

each post is automatically sent to blog directories and search engines , including Google Blogsearch , and can be found almost instantly
you can develop your own network or community online
a blog can promote a brand in a subtle and effective way
you can offer your products for sale from a built-in shopping cart in the blog
a blog can be designed in a search engine friendly way to maximise the number of visitors
A blog must be unique and most of its uniqueness can come from the personality of the blogger.Photogold offers a blog set up and design service for companies – Total cost £250
– your own unique domain
– hosting for one year
– layout and theme of your choice – choose from thousands of different designs
– Built in shopping cart to take orders online
– registration with Google Blog Search and Technorati , the 2 biggest online blog directories plus submission to 50 other directories

more details of art blogs

About Photogold David

Photographer David Rankin set up the UK's first online prints gallery , Photogold , in 1998