Game On by Jack Vettriano

Speculation is mounting over the paintings including Game On which might  be featured in the Jack Vettriano exhibition which will be opening in Kirkcaldy next year . Vettriano has stated that his most famous painting The Singing Butler will be part of the exhibition  . Sotheby’s auctioneers are  helping him track down his best-known paintings, seeking loans from  collectors and anonymous buyers.
Vettriano has, somewhat optimistically ,  offered the show to the National Galleries of Scotland, which has always shunned his work.
It was “mildly short of a disgrace” that NGS had never shown or bought his work for the national collection, he said, adding: “That may be the opportunity for the National Galleries to say, ‘Right, we’ll show this stuff and let the public make their minds up’.”
Vettriano has been on tour in the UK including an  appearance at the Aberdeen Music Hall taking questions from up to 800 people. It was something he had never done before,  showing the popularity of the so-called “People’s Painter”. Game On was published as a limited Edition Giclee print , Paper: 310 gsm Hahnemuhle mould made paper

New Terry Bradley exhibition

Artist Terry Bradley’s new exhibition shows a new side to his work .

“It’s another side to what I do — there are the heavily-tattooed men and women that I’m best known for and now there are these lighter, calmer works.

“They’ll be on display for the first time in the old Northern Bank building on Waring Street, which is a perfect setting.”

Terry painted his first canvas 14 years ago as a present, but his work is now held in private collections all over the world and fans include Madonna, The Bee Gees, Michael Flatley, Bono and Ronan Keating.

As well as famous patrons, Terry has attracted new admirers in the most unexpected place — Northern Ireland’s prisons — and he recently spent time behind bars with male and female inmates. He explains: “Earlier this year, I received an email from Magilligan Prison saying the inmates loved my work and would I have any brochures or anything I could send to them. Then I heard that a prisoner had committed suicide and decided to go and speak to them in person.
“I also went to Hydebank Women’s Prison and the inmates had pictures on the wall of their versions of my female paintings.

“Again, I just spent time talking with them about their lives, art and about why and how I do what I do. There were bare canvasses in one corner of the room and as I knew a few of the women were soon to be released, I did some drawings and gave them one each. I told them that they would be worth a few grand and that it would give them a start, or they could just keep the sketches for themselves. They really appreciated that. Meeting people like that does as much for me as it does for them. It really lifts me up. Art is a great thing. As therapy, it’s been hippie-fied a bit, but it is a very rewarding thing to do and a great way of expressing yourself.When my father died earlier this year, I received flowers from the prisoners, which was really touching.”

One of four children born and bred in the Oldpark Road area of north Belfast, Terry began his working life as a model in Dublin. He was sketching and drawing since his days at Newtownbreda High School, but a nightclub owner spotted his potential .

“In 1995, I did a piece as a present for a friend who had always looked after me when I was broke,” he recalls.

He owned a club called The Pod in Dublin and I painted a picture of all the regulars. He loved it and asked me to put on a show.

“I declined at first, but after a few more drinks, I agreed. I was astonished when it sold out and things progressed from there.”

Married to former medical photographer Ashley, who now helps him with the business side of things, Terry divides his time between homes in Kircubbin and Dublin.He admits that combining the solitary life of an artist with being dad to Zak (10), Hal (7) and Etta Blue (5) can sometimes lead to unusual living arrangements.
Although his paintings now sell for thousands of pounds, Terry insists that becoming successful was far from easy.

“Nothing comes to your door. You have to put yourself out there and get your work seen. I may be doing ok now, but it wasn’t always like that.Everyone thinks it’s a glamorous existence, but they don’t see what goes into it and the personal sacrifices.For instance, yesterday I worked all day and then all night until 4am, full-on. And I’ve been doing that for years.Yes, there are nice things I can do now, but it’s taken a long time and as well as drive, an awful lot of luck was involved.For a young artist starting out today, it’s beyond tough. I can see why people opt for illustration and computer design because you can make a decent living from that.

“I know a lot of computer designers who are resigned to being artists on the side. There are a lot of facilities available and a lot of talent out there. But the local art scene and the funding in Northern Ireland is all very closed shop, ‘who you know’ and ‘let’s not rock the boat’. It’s terrible.There isn’t any help or support for someone who is outside the ‘clique’.

Terry , much like Jack Vettriano , has had to develop a thick skin himself to deal with the snobs who look down on his unique style and self-taught status.

“Art is for everyone, but the high-brow art world tends to close itself away in rooms and have nothing to do with people on the street. I avoid that whole scene. I do what I do and freely admit I have no idea about other artists or art history. I do admire Jack Vettriano though, simply because of the way he is. His commercial success and style is sneered at by critics, yet people love his work. That’s the way I am. I’m just a guy. I do what I do and if people like my paintings and buy them, I’m over the moon.”
Terry Bradley’s new exhibition will be unveiled at a private showing in the old Northern Bank building, 2 Waring Street, Belfast, on Thursday. The exhibition then opens to the public at Eakin Gallery, Lisburn Road, until November 27 . Jack Vettriano is one of Photogold ‘s first artists

Art auction of Picasso, Renoir and Monet

Sotheby’s Evening Sale of Impressionist and Modern Art in New York on 4 November 2009 presents an amazing range of work from a group of classic Impressionist pictures by Renoir, Pissarro and Sisley from the family of famous dealer Paul Durand-Ruel, to key works by modern masters such as Picasso, Giacometti, Derain and Joan Miró.
Many are fresh to the market as they come from private collections and estates and . Prior to the auction, the works will be on view in Sotheby’s 10th floor galleries from 30 October to 4 November 2009.
Late works by Pablo Picasso have been very successful at auction this year and Sotheby’s is offering one of the artist’s greatest monumental interpretations of the musketeer, Buste d’homme (est. $8/2 million). In October 1969, Picasso executed several canvases on the theme of a man seated in an armchair and the present oil is the largest of the group (195 x 130 cm). The canvas was included in the 1970 exhibition of the artist’s recent work at the Palais des Papes in Avignon and has not been shown publicly since. The recent exhibitions Picasso et les maîtres at the Grand Palais in Paris, and Picasso: Challenging the Past at the National Gallery in London have led to a critical reappraisal of Picasso’s late years which are now recognized as one the most fertile and inspired periods of the greatest artist of the 20th century . The present work has been consigned by a Private European Collection and has never before been offered at auction.
Another classic Impressionist work from a private Belgian collection is Claude Monet’s Clématites (est. $2.5/3.5 million). Painted in Monet’s garden at Giverny in the summer of 1887, the present work belongs to a series of paintings in which flowers dominate the picture space to the exclusion of any sort of landscape or contextualizing background. In its scale and focus, the present painting prefigures the artist’s later fascination with waterlilies. The single-minded concentration on leaf and petal spread out across the picture plane provides a precedent for the waterlily compositions, leading ultimately to the dissolution of form by light and color which led Monet to the limits of abstraction.
Seven paintings from the Durand-Ruel Family encompass works by a number of the Impressionist masters that legendary art dealer Paul Durand-Ruel represented — Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Camille Pissarro and Alfred Sisley. All but one work were acquired by Durand-Ruel directly from the artists and all have remained in the family ever since. This direct line from the great champion of Impressionism is a truly impeccable provenance. Three works by Pierre-Auguste Renoir will be offered including Femme au Chapeau Blanc which belongs to a series of oils that Renoir completed in the early 1890s of young women wearing elaborate chapeaux (est. $2.5/3.5 million).

Selling art online for new artists

Hammersley Red Rocks by Rolf Harris
Hammersley Red Rocks by Rolf Harris

New artists can find it difficult to start selling their art for many reasons . There are 2 options which I would recommend for anyone trying to sell their art .

First of all artists should contact local and online galleries to showcase their work . Each gallery can offer something different so it is important to speak to a wide range of businesses.

Secondly, in the digital age every artist should have his or her own website . An online presence is vital in order to establish your name . A website gives an artist credibility and the ability to sell their own work without any commission. There are many different approaches to setting up an ecommerce site. Photogold set this site up in 1998 and we have been selling art online ever since . Our new project Photogold Ecommerce offers artists the option of having their own website with an integrated shopping cart . We can give advice on the best way of promoting your new website . For more details phone David Rankin on 07723-538941 or contact us online

Photogold goes mobile

the game of life , jack vettriano
the game of life , jack vettriano

Photogold is going mobile with our new mobile website – www.photogold.mobi . The new mobile site is specifically designed for mobile phones . The site features picture galleries of artists including Jack Vettriano with online ordering.Photogold has been selling art at great online prices since 1998 . For more details phone sales manager David Rankin on 07723 538941 for our best price .Photogold is committed to supplying products of the highest quality. All products come with a 100% satisfaction guarantee.