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Art auction of Picasso, Renoir and Monet

Sotheby’s Evening Sale of Impressionist and Modern Art in New York on 4 November 2009 presents an amazing range of work from a group of classic Impressionist pictures by Renoir, Pissarro and Sisley from the family of famous dealer Paul Durand-Ruel, to key works by modern masters such as Picasso, Giacometti, Derain and Joan Miró.
Many are fresh to the market as they come from private collections and estates and . Prior to the auction, the works will be on view in Sotheby’s 10th floor galleries from 30 October to 4 November 2009.
Late works by Pablo Picasso have been very successful at auction this year and Sotheby’s is offering one of the artist’s greatest monumental interpretations of the musketeer, Buste d’homme (est. $8/2 million). In October 1969, Picasso executed several canvases on the theme of a man seated in an armchair and the present oil is the largest of the group (195 x 130 cm). The canvas was included in the 1970 exhibition of the artist’s recent work at the Palais des Papes in Avignon and has not been shown publicly since. The recent exhibitions Picasso et les maîtres at the Grand Palais in Paris, and Picasso: Challenging the Past at the National Gallery in London have led to a critical reappraisal of Picasso’s late years which are now recognized as one the most fertile and inspired periods of the greatest artist of the 20th century . The present work has been consigned by a Private European Collection and has never before been offered at auction.
Another classic Impressionist work from a private Belgian collection is Claude Monet’s Clématites (est. $2.5/3.5 million). Painted in Monet’s garden at Giverny in the summer of 1887, the present work belongs to a series of paintings in which flowers dominate the picture space to the exclusion of any sort of landscape or contextualizing background. In its scale and focus, the present painting prefigures the artist’s later fascination with waterlilies. The single-minded concentration on leaf and petal spread out across the picture plane provides a precedent for the waterlily compositions, leading ultimately to the dissolution of form by light and color which led Monet to the limits of abstraction.
Seven paintings from the Durand-Ruel Family encompass works by a number of the Impressionist masters that legendary art dealer Paul Durand-Ruel represented — Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Camille Pissarro and Alfred Sisley. All but one work were acquired by Durand-Ruel directly from the artists and all have remained in the family ever since. This direct line from the great champion of Impressionism is a truly impeccable provenance. Three works by Pierre-Auguste Renoir will be offered including Femme au Chapeau Blanc which belongs to a series of oils that Renoir completed in the early 1890s of young women wearing elaborate chapeaux (est. $2.5/3.5 million).

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Selling art online for new artists

Hammersley Red Rocks by Rolf Harris
Hammersley Red Rocks by Rolf Harris

New artists can find it difficult to start selling their art for many reasons . There are 2 options which I would recommend for anyone trying to sell their art .

First of all artists should contact local and online galleries to showcase their work . Each gallery can offer something different so it is important to speak to a wide range of businesses.

Secondly, in the digital age every artist should have his or her own website . An online presence is vital in order to establish your name . A website gives an artist credibility and the ability to sell their own work without any commission. There are many different approaches to setting up an ecommerce site. Photogold set this site up in 1998 and we have been selling art online ever since . Our new project Photogold Ecommerce offers artists the option of having their own website with an integrated shopping cart . We can give advice on the best way of promoting your new website . For more details phone David Rankin on 07723-538941 or contact us online

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Photogold goes mobile

the game of life , jack vettriano
the game of life , jack vettriano

Photogold is going mobile with our new mobile website – www.photogold.mobi . The new mobile site is specifically designed for mobile phones . The site features picture galleries of artists including Jack Vettriano with online ordering.Photogold has been selling art at great online prices since 1998 . For more details phone sales manager David Rankin on 07723 538941 for our best price .Photogold is committed to supplying products of the highest quality. All products come with a 100% satisfaction guarantee.

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Irving Penn has died , aged 92

Photographer Irving Penn , one of the greatest photographers of the 20th century , has dies aged 92 . His pictures showed a stark simplicity whether he was shooting celebrity portraits, fashion, still life or remote places of the world. The death was announced by his photo assistant, Roger Krueger. Penn, who constantly explored the photographic medium and its boundaries, typically preferred to isolate his subjects — from fashion models to Aborigine tribesmen — from their natural settings to photograph them in a studio against a stark background. He believed the studio could most closely capture their true natures.

Between 1964 and 1971, he completed seven such projects, his subjects ranging from New Guinea mud men to San Francisco hippies. Penn also had a fascination with still life and produced a dramatic range of images that challenged the traditional idea of beauty, giving dignity to such subjects as cigarette butts, decaying fruit and discarded clothing. A 1977 show at the Metropolitan Museum of Art presented prints of trash rescued from Manhattan streets and photographed, lovingly, against plain backgrounds.

“Photographing a cake can be art,” he said at the 1953 opening of his studio, where he continued to produce commercial and gallery work into the 21st century.
Penn’s career began in the 1940s as a fashion photographer for Vogue, and he continued to contribute to the magazine for decades thereafter. He stumbled into the job almost by accident, when he abandoned his early ambition to become a painter and took a position as a designer in the magazine’s art department in 1943. Staff photographers balked at his unorthodox layout ideas, and a supervisor asked him to photograph a cover design.
The resulting image, on the Oct. 1, 1943, cover of Vogue, was a striking still-life showing a brown leather bag, a beige scarf, gloves, oranges and lemons arranged in the shape of a pyramid. In subsequent photographs for the magazine, Penn further developed his austere style that placed models and fashion accessories against clean backdrops. It was a radical departure at a time when most fashion photographers posed their subjects with props and in busy settings that tended to draw attention from the clothes themselves.